Saturday, March 14, 2020

X-Napster essays

X-Napster essays The infamous Napster under attack for its pirating of music from famous musicians needs to be shut down. Piracy is a major issue of moral standards, right, and wrong in the entertainment world. Napster is well known for its sharing of MP3 files through the Internet; taking, receiving, and bootlegging. Over 70% of college students said they use Napster at least once a month. The majority of its users are aware that Napster is an illegal bootlegging website, the federal government says. The U.S. Copyright Office says Napster's operations are clearly illegal under the very law Napster hopes will make its senior executives and well-heeled investors filthy rich which was written in 1992 saying that if a person wants to compile music to a personal CD for self then its ok. But in that law there was never any mention of legal dissemination to obtain the music. I oppose Napster because they have no coherent or viable plan to compensate artists. If Napster makes money off the dissemination of an artists copyrighted material then the artist should participate in those profits. (Currently Napster does not make a profit, however the fact that they raised at something like $40,000,000 in capital to finance their operation suggests that their investors obviously intend to make a profit one day). But the million dollar question is; should Napster be shut down because of its illegal sharing of files The answer is YES. BURNED CDs are a major issue in the U.S. To download from a website, and save it to a CD, or your computer. Personal music a person has made up, or created by himself is legal to save. But copyrighted music on the other hand is illegal. Commercial radio stations generate revenue off of the use of copyrighted material. Through longstanding arrangements with BMI and ASCAP a portion of that money (however small) is shared with the son ...

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

Discuss how moving-image(film and tv) based knowledge, drama and Essay

Discuss how moving-image(film and tv) based knowledge, drama and speaking and listening can contribute to pupil self confidence as readers and writers in the light of your study of Macbeth - Essay Example Exposure to the media and technology has increased manifolds in the present age as compared to the past. A major portion of the daily routine is dedicated to an individual’s interaction with the moving image in the form of the theatre, drama or movie. This practice serves to enhance the comprehension of the viewer and his perception is modified accordingly. The viewer analyzes what is projected in the media and in the context of his personal knowledge and experience in the subject matter and therefore starts to interact with the moving image. The greater exposure to moving image and the natural liking humans have for the same has materialized a need for using the moving image as a means of taking an individual’s perception of the literature to the next level. Moving image has a lot of potential to modify an individual’s attitude toward literature in the way in which it facilitates him to grasp the fundamental concepts of literature. Hence, use of the moving image in schools as a tool for developing the students’ interest and involvement in literature is indeed, a realization of the changing demands of education in the today’s media age. Owing to the strong relation of moving image with the cognitive learning, the need for its inclusion in the curriculum is largely felt. It is widely recognized as a new dimension of literacy, often referred to as cineliteracy and is defined as, â€Å"The ability to analyze moving images, to talk about how they work, and to imagine their creative potential, drawing upon a wide film and television viewing experience as well as on practical skills†. (British Film Institute, 2000). In order to gain full advantage of the moving image for educational purposes, it is imperative that the language of moving image is recognized as a separate field that needs to be explored not only by the students but also by the

Monday, February 10, 2020

Pilot Unions Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 words

Pilot Unions - Essay Example These elites do not care about the upper mobility of the middle and lower classes thus they have made college to be expensive and in turn most people from such economic classes are shunning away from college. This will empower the upper classes and their well-educated children to place a stranglehold on labor laws and civil liberties in America.2 Further, there have been transformations in workplaces such as downsizing, rise of contingency work, tightening of coordination, human relations management and squeezing wages.3 Downsizing has resulted to a lesser number of Americans being employed on full time basis due to automation and a rise in contingency work in corporations. Consequently, workload is increased on those employees who remain. Due to engagement of robots services, there have been fewer industrial jobs and less leverage in bargaining with management for the employee who remain. In addition, computerization has increased the ability to service more people thus limiting the number of professionals needed in advanced industrial societies. There has been a rise of the contingency worker through the replacement of permanent workers with temporary or part-time ones. The latter are usually paid less and draw no fringe benefits which works well for the corporations. Such corporations thus remain globally competitive, expand and contract with product lines and market cycles, avoid healthcare and pension costs, vacation pay, training programs and government anti-discriminatory rules. Corporations have tightened coordination through the use of computer systems that coordinate the flow of raw materials, machine time, labor and other resources and the front office is thus able to monitor and coordinate retail and clerical work. For instance, with the employment of the Bell telephone operators, every fifteen minutes, computer terminals near supervisor’s desks print out the office’s complete

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Experience of working within a social work organization Essay Example for Free

Experience of working within a social work organization Essay Introduction Organization is a social unit of people that is structured and managed to meet a need or to pursue collective goals .All organizations have a management structure that determines relationships between the different activities and the members, and subdivides and assigned roles, responsibility and authority to carry out different task (Sorenson, 1999, p. 76). Initially I will give a brief back ground about organisation of my placement, the Primary task, Authority and issues of diversity and inter-professional working. Interpersonal skills of a mental health professional are essential for an effective multidisciplinary team member, interpersonal skills, characteristics and attitudes are key to team working. Individuals on a team should be encouraged, through reflective practice and appropriate support, to examine their own characteristics and how they might adapt to a team environment. It is also important to recognize that while mental health professionals may have well-developed skills within their own area of expertise, it should not be assumed that they have all of the skills needed to collaborate effectively with others as part of a team. There is the primary task (also referred to as functional task or work task), this corresponds with the mission of an organization. Most organizations face multiple tasks all vying to be expressed in the service of the primary task. This is the point where authority, becomes central, i.e. the person who decides what task has priority. It is the authority boundary in conjunction with the task boundary that helps the task become clear and for the work of the group to be taken on successfully. (Hayden and Molenkamp, 2002, p. 7). Absent clarity at the authority boundary, destructive chaos is likely to result and the survival of the group is in peril. While in some instances such a collapse is desirable for the new to arise and for the task to be met. Yet from the perspective of the group that dies, the loss continues to live well after the time boundary passes. The primary task of my group in the organization, include case management, analysis of social welfare policies, and Care management’ was considered to be fundamental element of the community care reforms in the 1990 Act. In 2003 one in ten of local authority social workers were employed as care managers but it is difficult to know what this meant in terms of their roles and function. In theory the core tasks included: case finding and referral; assessment and selection; care planning and service packaging; monitoring and re-assessment; and case closure. (Knapp et al, 2005: 40). Functions that team the play for society was our objectives as a team was to create a society in the next two decades in which no child lives in poverty and where all children have opportunities to realize their potential. Improving opportunities for disadvantaged children is at the heart of our strategy.   (HM Treasury 1999, p. 39). As with older people, the consistent message that disabled people have given about the services they receive is that they do not adequately meet their needs. Research by Jenny Morris in the early 1990s found that statutory services were inflexible; were only available for the most basic personal care tasks; tended to `fit the client to the service’ rather than the service to the client; were provided in a way that reduced independence; and were only available to people in their own home so they could not be helped to go out, either to social activities or to work. Authority boundaries and facilitating structures, the role of authority boundaries and structures is to provide a space or object for the anxiety and worry work to be displaced among social workers, so that the group can attend to the task realistically and appropriately. The term leader acts out as the organization’s ambivalence and splitting. Interpreting this situation through Hirschhorn’s model suggests problematic consequences. The issue groups volunteers to take up the organizational tasks and attendant risks offered and accepted authority and, using Colin’s facilitating structures, did important work; they thus entered the virtuous cycle. This process, however, reduced the authority and increased the anxiety in the top team; they were likely to be heading for a vicious cycle of anxiety, leading to social defences, and therefore dysfunctional process and inhibiting structure. Thus, there were two competing processes: one facilitating change and the other undermining it. All organizations have socially constructed defences against the anxiety which is aroused through carrying out the primary task of the organization ( Isabel Menzies 1970 p.496) These social defences may be evident in the organization structure, in its procedures, information systems, roles, in its culture, and in the gap between what the organizations says it is doing and what it is actually doing. Social defences are â€Å"created† unconsciously by members of the organization through their interactions in carrying out the primary task. Social defaces helps the top team rarely to operate in the â€Å"work group† mode; basic assumption behavior is more prevalent. The term leader, in his leadership, yet an analysis of the top team’s dynamics suggests a high degree of basic assumption dependence. Additionally, lack human diversity within any given organization if the workplace is within, to coin (Hirschhorn’s, 1988 pp.39) term, then the learning organization must account for the variety of images that obtrude from the personal histories of each member. The work of (Kets de Vries and Miller 1985, pp.239) illustrates clearly the consequences of the neurotic qualities of managers permeating the working relations within an organization. Additionally, an element of diversity is a person’s age and life stage (pp.246) .On a different front writers such as (Gilligan 1982 pp.23) and (Schachtel , 1989 pp.214)   have argued in their own ways that gender influences strongly the way in which men and women engage with their world. The learning disabilities which Senge sees connected to structural manifestations of hierarchy and segmentation may be understood more deeply as evidence of patriarchal, phallocentric modes of engagement. Yet a reading of Senge shows no consideration of neurosis, age or gender, let alone libido, in the dynamics of the learning process. Furthermore, he does not consider how any one of these affects a person’s readiness to learn, which differs substantially between people at different times. He asserts that the learning organization is one which will end the war between home and work when managers realize that effective parenting is the model for leadership. Knowlden (1998) suggested that experience impact on a social worker ability to be caring; as a student social worker I was often overwhelmed by the working environment. This could imply that it is not the amount of experience which is important, but the length of time it takes for a social work to acclimatize. Support mechanisms such as preceptorship and clinical supervision may, therefore, have a role in facilitating compassionate care. (Pearcey’s 2007 p.29) study offers some support for Wright’s views. As a social work I observed that qualified social workers mainly cared for patients’ medical needs, with the core element delegated to junior practitioners. Many years ago a ‘task-centred’ approach to organizing care was proposed as a possible defence mechanism against the anxiety that a more interpersonal style of working creates (Menzies, 1970 p.258). This may offer some insight into the behaviour of social workers who seek refuge in form filling and other activities not directly related to care. Social worker students from different health disciplines often have little idea of what each other’s roles entail. Inter-professional learning increase this knowledge, as well as giving students an understanding of the interpersonal skills needed for liaison and communication. Every professional has its own roles, skills and responsibilities making for efficient practices in curing, managing or treating particular ailments, but has this always created cohesive team working in day-to-day working life. In my social worker practice fitting in the organization hierarchy was a problem, and I was not able to question, share knowledge and learn together without professional and defensive boundaries. Often, an institutional hierarchy may obstruct the flow of communication and prevent a person from contributing and feeling valued, which ultimately can negatively affect patient care (Reynolds, 2005 p.19). More longitudinal studies are needed that follow through and beyond my undergraduate studies, along with critical observation of the learning process. Standardizing in the curricula of all health professionals can improve key skills and prepare students for their careers by driving up standards of professionalism and best practice. Sometimes, in the hierarchy of the hospital, it is hard to know what one place is as a student social worker student. When one is it the bottom of the totem pole.   No one in this hospital is lower than me. I think most of us have probably gotten that vibe at some point, even if it hasn’t been explicitly articulated.   There’s the simple fact that, in some ways, we are occasionally more of a burden to the hospital than a benefit.   It’s a constant between trying to be useful, trying to learn something and really make the most of rotation, and simply not getting in the way. For example â€Å"one of social worker will help you,† the term leader said.   Maybe he was joking?   I couldn’t tell his intonation could have gone either way. Then, the leader handed me a folder.   Ã¢â‚¬Å"Here, fan her with this,† she said.   Again joking?   Not sure.   Ã‚  And naturally, being a social worker student, my mind immediately leapt to the assumption that they would think I wasn’t a team player if I didn’t agree to fan her. So really, what else could I do?   When the staff physician walked in, I tried to be nonchalant about the fact that I was standing by the patient’s head and fanning her with a purple confidentiality. Being at the bottom of the hierarchy within a multidisciplinary asking question is also a careful balance. A friend a year ahead of me gave me some pretty phenomenal advice:   If it’s a question related to patient care or unique to a particular situation, or about management of your patient’s condition ask away.   Of course, there’s a time and a place for everything. From the view of the individual I have sketched, the important questions about groups are those devoted to the conditions that take away the factors in social environment that ordinarily keep his self-system in its normal integration. (Bion, 1961: 145-6) Bion stated that the basic assumptions are states of mind the individuals in the group get into. The awareness of the group remains in its regressed form because the group is there and so restrains further disintegration which would be tantamount to psychotic states, an eventuality that the early structuring of the self also resists desperately. The problems of group dynamics thus become those of how the normal affirmations of the self system are removed. The situations of groups in this respect are of almost infinite variety. Thus when Bion said that certain illnesses might originate as diseases of the group, he thought specific illnesses might prove to be linked to specific states of the group. Here the most prominent stem from the task. Although there may have been some nominal description such as to study group processes, none of the members has any clear notion of what that task involves this affected my group as I was working with. There is therefore immediately a considerable loss for the self of its ego anchorage in reality. Important also is the realization that the task, in whatever form it emerges, will involve members in some exposure of their private and even hidden self. This factor I believe to be important in the group dynamics group, although much more so in the therapeutic one. Since the origin of the secret self was its unacceptability, there is a great deal of anxious suspicion among members is that which he expresses some of his feelings about the situation. In conclusion, from my experience, I have learnt that it is important for both the student and the organization placement staff to be aware of who is going where before the placement starts. A good social worker student will contact the organization team in advance of the placement in order to check what time to turn up, and whether there is any uniform policy or other protocols they should be aware of. Likewise a good ward team and mentor will encourage the student to come on a preliminary visit just to be given the above information and to say hello. It can help enormously to reduce anxiety on a first day if the student already knows one or two faces. On a pre-placement visit the student can be introduced to their mentor and have a quick chat and any placement reading can be handed out together with the placement information pack, outlining learning opportunities and ward information, shift pattern, dress code etc. Off duty rotas can be planned together and a pre-placement visit can also be the forum for any negotiation over study days and child care needs etc., so that the anxiety over these can be managed prior to the placement. A good welcoming pre-placement visit can begin the process of socialization into the team and its culture and can give the student an early sense of belonging. References Bion, W.R., (1961) Experiences in groups and other papers. London: Tavistock Publications [Reprinted London: Routledge, 1989; London: Brunner-Routledge, 2001.] Corbin, J. (2008) Is caring a lost art in nursing? International Journal of Nursing Studies; 45, 163-165. Gilligan, C. (1982), In a Different Voice, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, . Hayden, C. Molenkamp, R. J. (2002). â€Å"Tavistock primer II.† Jupiter, FL: The A. K. Rice Institute for the Study of Social Systems. Hirschhorn, L. (1988), The Workplace Within: Psychodynamics of Organizational Life, MIT   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Press, Cambridge, MA, . HM Treasury (1999) Opportunity for All London. The Stationary Kets de Vries, M., Miller, D. (1985), The Neurotic Organization, Jossey Bass, London, . Knowlden, V. (1998) The Communication of Caring in Nursing. Indianapolis: Center Nursing Press. Menzies, I.E.P. (1970) The Functioning of Social Systems as a Defence Against Anxiety: Report on a Study of the Nursing Service of aGeneral Hospital. London: Tavistock Institute of Marital Studies. Pearcey, P. (2007) Tasks and routines in 21st century nursing: student nurses’ perceptions. British Journal of Nursing; 16: 5, 296-300. Reynolds F (2005) Communication and Clinical Effectiveness in Rehabilitation. Edinburgh: Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann Schachtel, Z. (1989), Men, women, and work, in Changing Group Relations. The Proceedings of the Ninth Scientific Meeting of the A.K. Rice Institute (Eds),New York, NY, . Senge, P.M., Roberts, C., Ross, R.B., Smith, B.J., Kleiner, A. (1994), The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook: Strategies and Tools for Building a Learning Organization, Nicholas Brealey Publishing, London, . Senge, P.M. (1990), The leader’s new work: building learning organizations, Sloan Management Review, Fall Reprint 3211, Sorenson, G. (1999). Taking the robes off: when leaders step down. In B. Kellerman and L. Matusak(Eds.), Cutting Edge: Leadership 2000. College Park, MD: Academy of Leadership Press, 1999. Tweddell, L. (2007) Compassion on the curriculum. Nursing Times; 103: 38, 18-19.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Shakespeare presents Antony, Cleopatra, and Caesar as committed only to

The language Shakespeare uses in Antony and Cleopatra is concerned overwhelmingly with image and display. As Enobarbus describes the first meeting of the lovers we are drawn in to a world of colour and wealth, ‘The barge she sat in, like a burnished throne,/ Burned on the water’. Cleopatra herself is described in even more majestic – even divine – terms, ‘o’erpicturing’ the goddess Venus. Antony himself is ‘the crown of the earth’, whose eyes ‘glowed like plated Mars’, while Caesar is ‘a Jove’, whose ascendancy will bring ‘the time of universal peace’ – an allusion, Rene Weis suggests, to the everlasting kingdom of Christ. However, it is debatable as to whether the characters themselves share the intent of the grand words surrounding them, and if they are as committed to image as this quotation suggests. Antony, in fact, seems to surrender his public image completely for Cleopatra’s sake. The play opens with a comment on the received view, Antony has become a ‘strumpet’s fool’. Indeed, he is willing to sacrifice Rome and his worldly status in virtue of his love for Cleopatra, ‘let Rome in Tiber melt, and the wide arch/ Of the ranged empire fall’. Only absolute political necessity can draw him from Egypt, and even then he recognises that ‘i’th’East my pleasure lies’. His marriage to Octavia angers Cleopatra greatly, but it was enacted only to placate Caesar and is soon rendered useless as he returns promptly to Egypt. Furthermore, his heroic image [he was said by Plutarch to have been like Hercules] is damaged by his preferences, Caesar mocks him as ‘womanly’ while even Antony himself cries at Cleopatra’s servant ‘O, thy vile lady! She has robbed me of my sword!’ In a sense, it appears that Antony has been unmanned by his com... ...d me my robes, put on my crown’ – shows her determination to make a memorable final tableau. On the other hand, and more likely given the divine undertones and implications in the language, she seeks Antony in a life beyond death, realising that life and politics – those ‘baser elements’ – are trivial compared to everlasting love. A conclusion can now be established. Antony is positively unconcerned with display, he sacrifices image and politics alike for the love of his Egyptian queen. Caesar is centred on image – the very nature of his role in power demands it, and his highly rhetorical speeches are testament to this aspect of his character. Cleopatra seems to develop as the play progresses from a character more comparable to Caesar to truly Antony’s lover, ultimately sacrificing the most precious gift – life itself – in favour of an afterlife in his company. Shakespeare presents Antony, Cleopatra, and Caesar as committed only to The language Shakespeare uses in Antony and Cleopatra is concerned overwhelmingly with image and display. As Enobarbus describes the first meeting of the lovers we are drawn in to a world of colour and wealth, ‘The barge she sat in, like a burnished throne,/ Burned on the water’. Cleopatra herself is described in even more majestic – even divine – terms, ‘o’erpicturing’ the goddess Venus. Antony himself is ‘the crown of the earth’, whose eyes ‘glowed like plated Mars’, while Caesar is ‘a Jove’, whose ascendancy will bring ‘the time of universal peace’ – an allusion, Rene Weis suggests, to the everlasting kingdom of Christ. However, it is debatable as to whether the characters themselves share the intent of the grand words surrounding them, and if they are as committed to image as this quotation suggests. Antony, in fact, seems to surrender his public image completely for Cleopatra’s sake. The play opens with a comment on the received view, Antony has become a ‘strumpet’s fool’. Indeed, he is willing to sacrifice Rome and his worldly status in virtue of his love for Cleopatra, ‘let Rome in Tiber melt, and the wide arch/ Of the ranged empire fall’. Only absolute political necessity can draw him from Egypt, and even then he recognises that ‘i’th’East my pleasure lies’. His marriage to Octavia angers Cleopatra greatly, but it was enacted only to placate Caesar and is soon rendered useless as he returns promptly to Egypt. Furthermore, his heroic image [he was said by Plutarch to have been like Hercules] is damaged by his preferences, Caesar mocks him as ‘womanly’ while even Antony himself cries at Cleopatra’s servant ‘O, thy vile lady! She has robbed me of my sword!’ In a sense, it appears that Antony has been unmanned by his com... ...d me my robes, put on my crown’ – shows her determination to make a memorable final tableau. On the other hand, and more likely given the divine undertones and implications in the language, she seeks Antony in a life beyond death, realising that life and politics – those ‘baser elements’ – are trivial compared to everlasting love. A conclusion can now be established. Antony is positively unconcerned with display, he sacrifices image and politics alike for the love of his Egyptian queen. Caesar is centred on image – the very nature of his role in power demands it, and his highly rhetorical speeches are testament to this aspect of his character. Cleopatra seems to develop as the play progresses from a character more comparable to Caesar to truly Antony’s lover, ultimately sacrificing the most precious gift – life itself – in favour of an afterlife in his company.

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

The Unabomber

The Unabomber For 17 years, an elusive criminal sent homemade bombs that targeted universities, airlines and computer stores, killing three people and injuring 23 others. The FBI branded Theodore Kaczynski a domestic terrorist, with the nickname the â€Å"Unabomber† (Unabomber). Theodore â€Å"Ted† Kaczynski was born in Chicago, Illinois, where, as a child prodigy, he excelled academically. He was accepted into Harvard University at the age of 16, where he graduated from four years later and then earned a PhD in mathematics several years after that.He then accepted a position at The University of California, Berkley campus as an assistant professor at the age of 25 (Unabomber). After two years at Berkley, Kaczynski seemed to have lost interest in everything around him. He quit his job and moved to an isolated cabin, without electricity or running water, in Lincoln, Montana. He wanted to learn survival skills in an attempt to become self-sufficient (Kaczynski). After wit nessing the wilderness and environment around him get destroyed by industrial development, Kaczynski decided to start a bombing campaign (Kaczynski).From 1978 to 1995, Kaczynski sent sixteen bombs to targets, including universities and airlines (Unabomber). The first mail bomb was sent in late May 1978 to materials engineering professor Buckley Crist at Northwestern University, where a policeman, Terry Marker, opened the package which exploded immediately, leaving him with severe injuries to his left hand (Unabomber). He not only mailed his bombs, but would also hand place them throughout the United States. In California Kaczynski hand placed a nail and splinter loaded bomb in a parking lot of a computer store.When it was touched, it exploded, killing the 38-year-old computer store owner (Unabomber). Theodore was not just a murder with no motive, he proclaimed that humans were ruining the world through technology (Kaczynski). After 17 years of his bombing campaign, he sent his 35,00 0-word essay â€Å"Industrial Society and Its Future†, abbreviated to â€Å"Unabomber Manifesto† to major media outlets around the U. S. (Unabomber). The essay called for a worldwide revolution against the effects of modern society's â€Å"industrial-technological system† (Kaczynski).He stated that â€Å"the Industrial Revolution and its consequences have been a disaster for the human race† (Kaczynski). Several months after the Unabomber Manifesto was printed on the Washington Post, Kaczinski's brother and wife recognized his brothers writing styles and beliefs and tipped off the police. FBI officers arrested Kaczynski on April 3rd, 1996, at his remote cabin in Lincoln, Montana. Theodore thinks of himself as perfectly sane, with justifiable reasons connected to his crimes (Kaczynski). Theodore Kaczynski was sentenced to eight life sentences in prison with no possibility of parole.

Monday, January 6, 2020

Learning and Communicating Online Essay - 1697 Words

COM10003 Learning and Communicating Online Assessment 3: Reflective essay This essay will discuss how my use of online information has grown from being merely a consumer, to now being able to critically evaluate online sources for credibility and suitability for use in academic work. My role in producing an online informational resource has been enhanced by both the readings, and the experience gained in the collaborative process involved in working as a team. This is my first experience at online collaboration and I will examine the challenges encountered using this medium of communication, how I dealt with them, the lessons learned, and what I would do differently during future collaborative work. Before this course, my experience†¦show more content†¦35-36) as mentioned earlier, and ratifying the information by other credible sources, such as www.drugfreeworld.org. Apon revisiting the web site NewsComAu.com, I realised that I had overlooked certain criteria while compiling our online presentation, and although the website’s coverage and currency are good, and the information I used is ratified by other sources, I now notice that the article I used is not referenced and the website is full of advertisements and sensational stories, which although not wrong in itself, would tend to question the objectivity and in turn the authority of the site, and I would hesitate to use it again, NewsComAu, (2014). Eelink.net (1999) inform us that although it is wise to evaluate a website, that ‘good information can be found on bad sites’, and re affirms the need to evaluate the information found on a website as well as the website itself. This becomes particular ly applicable if we cannot find information on our subject of research on so called ‘good sites’, which may in fact turn out to have a bias regarding even reporting certain information. This leads us to consider our personal bias, which according to Eelink.net (1999) we all have. Our bias needs to be taken into consideration, because if unchecked this could cause us to dismiss information while researching a subject simply because we personally disagree with it,Show MoreRelatedWhat I Have Learned During The Course Learning And Communicating Online1786 Words   |  8 Pageshave learned during the course Learning and Communicating Online. The course has helped me overcome my fear of social media. I was unsure at first, but I quickly became used to using different types of social media for my academic research. In taking this course, it has helped me to learn much about evaluating the quality of internet sources. I will also touch on the different types of social media pl atforms and how social media has contributed to my online learning. Lastly the advantages and disadvantagesRead MoreCommunication And Technology : Unites The Classrooms905 Words   |  4 Pagesstudents learning. When entering into a classroom one of the things that stand out is the huge electronic white board and all the technology it incorporates. Also, the student’s personal laptops, online usernames, and passwords provide studies beyond the classroom. In the education system students are communicating with technology and is becoming the daily routine in classrooms, which it doesn’t separate them in their education, but creates a bond that can only lead to successful learning outcomesRead MoreStrategic Plan For East Noble School Corporation1370 Words   |  6 Pages and five elementary schools. The current Strategic Plan for ENSC is for the years spanning 2013 to 2017. The ENSC Strategic Plan has three main goals: 1. East Noble School Corporation will expand students’ educational experiences with diverse learning opportunities to ensure preparation for their successful future. 2. Establish the culture of community ownership in East Noble School Corporation. 3. Provide and maintain facilities that meet the academic and extra-curricular of the East Noble CommunityRead MoreLearning From Traditional Classroom And Learning997 Words   |  4 Pages I have experience in both learning from the traditional classroom and learning from the online setting. I can easily identify the differences between these two types of learning environments. The two main differences can be divided by two categories which are flexibility and class discussions (Bethel University, n.d.) ?There is far less flexibility in a traditional classroom (Bethel University, n.d.). As a formal student of a traditional classroom learning environment, I had to physicallyRead MorePersonal Philosophy Reflection Paper1203 Words   |  5 PagesFor the past six weeks, I learned how philosophy has influenced the world globally. Learning that when human beings voice their thoughts with others, they receive a chance to change the world, especially if one person speaks one on one, one personage can change the world of one body. My belief in the power of language is strengthened by philosophy. This philosophy course has encouraged me to share my opinions that are not influenced by other peers or older adults, but to deeply reflect and researchRead MoreApproaches to Visual Communication809 Words   |  3 Pagesto a be an immediate and creative means of garnering attention and getting across of number of different ideas efficiently. For this paper, I have chosen to take a closer look at approaches to visually communicating a very popular concept online education. Online education, or distance learning, rose sharply in the late 1990s. Today it is a convenient and common means of advancing ones education when work, career and family demands present challenges in making it into the traditional classroomRead MoreFace-to-Face Versus Online Education972 Words   |  4 Pages103 March 4, 2004 Research Paper 1 Face-to-Face Versus Online Education Education is essential to the future of our society. Many adults, including scholars and teachers, are constantly searching for the best way to educate students today. Face-to-face education, being the genuine form, seems to be the first choice of many students. However, online education is becoming more popular and is being used more often at universities. Online courses are convenient for some who have busy schedules whichRead MoreTeam Communication Essay example1141 Words   |  5 Pagessubordinates as well. The team concept and bonding with fellow sailors, Marines, soldiers, or airmen can be the difference between life and death. When out at sea on a ship there are hundreds, if not thousands, of dangers that can be avoided by communicating with other shipmates. While out on the battlefield with a squad or regiment, good teamwork may very well keep people from getting injured or maimed. There is no other fundamental as important as good communication with other team members inRead MoreNegative Effects Of Social Media Essay1053 Words   |  5 Pagesto be a negative effect on teens and society as a whole. Social media has a negative effect on teens because of online bullying, lack of communicating and socializing, and living in real time Social media can create many teens to become addicted to the internet and not be in real time. It has also created a lack of communicating in real life since teens are becoming used to communicating over the internet. Social media is also causing a decrease in advancing thoughts and ideas as well as not beingRead MoreA Digital World Of Information And Communication1625 Words   |  7 Pagesinto the higher order thinking skills of creating, critiquing and communicating ideas in a credible way. A student’s ability to read, write, problem-solve, work as part of a team, think critically, and use information from innovative technologies is essential to their education. The latest statistics claim that over three billion individuals now use the Internet to read, write, communicate, learn, and solve important problems online (Internet World Stats, 2014). By all indications, these numbers will